The above headline is sure to garner a spirited response from anyone born and raised in Louisiana, but currently, the idea of a "Too Hot to Work Law" is actually being debated in England.

Jeremy Zero via Unsplash.com
Jeremy Zero via Unsplash.com
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Too Hot To Work Law

The GMB Union is calling on the government in the UK and Ireland to create a "Too Hot to Work Law" in hopes of establishing a legal maximum working temperature.

The "Too Hot to Work Law" would be applicable to indoor work environments such as offices, warehouses, etc.

According to bbc.com -

"Lynsey Mann, the GMB's health and safety officer, said: 'This hot weather is great for being on a sun lounger, but if you're trying to work through it's no joke.'"

So, how hot is too hot to work?

According to The GMB Union, employees should not have to work in environments any higher than 25C, which converts to 77 degrees.

The hope is to have the "Too Hot to Work Law" establish a "legal upper limit of 30C in most workplaces - or 27C for those doing strenuous work" as reported by BBC.com.

Converted into Fahrenheit, the indoor legal upper limit would be 86 degrees, 80.6 degrees for anyone doing strenuous work.

City Workers Sit In The Sun
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The issue with the heat for our friends across the pond is, that businesses, homes, and buildings aren't built for the heat with the type of air conditioning systems we have in South Louisiana.

According to time.com, less than 5% of homes in England have air conditioning.

That, coupled with the fact England is reportedly going through a heatwave right now much like the rest of the world.

Forecasters are predicting a record high of 41C (106F) in England.

Although we might snicker at the thought of a "Too Hot to Work Law" when it's over 100 degrees outside when you don't have AC, it can be pretty difficult to get any work done.

As appealing as a "Too Hot to Work Law" might sound for Acadiana, never gonna happen for us, but unless England starts getting some AC going it seems like it might actually be a decent idea for them

Does anyone want to go start an AC company in London with me?

Read more at BBC.com.

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