As temperatures across Louisiana from New Orleans to Lake Charles and Shreveport to Tallulah climb into the middle 90s and higher this weekend a lot of us are thinking about the beach. The beach has water and breezes and for some reason, it just doesn't seem as hot at the beach as it does in a Walmart parking lot in Alexandria, does it?

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Thinkstock
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And while those of us who enjoy our time at the beach tend to think of rest and relaxation, there is danger lurking for those who have plans to travel east to the beaches of Florida and Lower Alabama, and if you're heading west to the beaches of Galveston Texas and the upper Texas Coast.

Texas Orders Beaches To Open After Being Closed For Coronavirus Pandemic
Callaghan O'Hare, Getty Images
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The good news is that the warnings that have been posted have nothing to do with bacteria in the water. That means that if you were to get into the water your health would likely not be compromised by an unseen force of nature. But getting into the water in Florida, Alabama, or Texas this weekend might not be a good idea for another reason.

weather.gov/mob
weather.gov/mob
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That's the rip current forecast for the northern Gulf Coast as provided by the National Weather Service Office in Mobile. As you can see, strong rip currents are not only possible but likely as we move into the Father's Day weekend. Rip currents can be deadly for all swimmers, even those who are strong swimmers need to be aware that the best swimming this weekend will likely be found in a resort or condo swimming pool.

Those planning a beach vacation on Galveston Island or the beaches of the Upper Texas Coast can expect choppy conditions. The National Weather Service site for Houston/Galveston shows a red flag warning but there is no advisory posted on the site.

So, that's confusing but better safe than sorry. And in case you're wondering about unsanitary conditions for swimming, so far most of the beaches on the Texas coast are not experiencing any issues with bacteria concentrations. 

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Staff Photo
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It's estimated that some 100 people will lose their lives to rip currents at beaches around the United States this year. It's important to heed the warning flags and check out the forecasts before you or your family takes a dip in the water. And no, you don't have to be too far out in the waves to get caught in a current that could take your life.

And while we hope you're never put in a position to perform life-saving rescue techniques on someone who was caught in a rip current, here is some good information to know.

21 Songs You Can Sing While Performing CPR

When performing CPR, rather than trying to count each compression, it is suggested that you quietly sing a song that has the proper rate of beats. The Bee Gee's “Stayin’ Alive” is aptly suggested as a choice. “Another One Bites the Dust”, by Queen, also fits the bill but probably isn’t appropriate. The following 21 songs have the proper 100/120 bpm to keep in time for chest compressions.

 

 

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